Counselling the whole person

Draft-cover-3

Updated on 14th August 2018:

On this page (and the continuation page) you will find several extracts from an exciting new book on Lifestyle counselling.

Those extracts include:

the full Preface of this book;

plus extracts from each chapter;

plus the full set of Contents pages;

plus the index.

This book summarizes the most important research on the links between diet, physical activity and sleep, on the one hand, and emotional states and mental health, on the other.

Many counsellors have found this book to be very helpful in understanding their clients’ emotional problems from a lifestyle perspective; and many of their positive comments have been included on these two pages.

If you are a counsellor, psychotherapist, or life coach, you can begin to use these insights in your work with clients whose poor lifestyle choices are negatively impacting their mental health and emotional wellbeing.  (Or you can use the book to help yourself – even if you are new to psychology and self-help!)

We have also posted some feedback from readers and commentators, in general, mainly from LinkedIn.

But first, here’s the full title:

Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching for the Whole Person:

Or how to integrate nutritional insights, physical exercise and sleep coaching into talk therapy

By Dr Jim Byrne with Renata Taylor-Byrne

(Copyright © Jim Byrne, 2018).

~~~

Cover, full, revised 7- Feb 13 2018

Draft-cover-3This book describes a holistic counselling and coaching system which integrates diet, exercise, self-talk, relaxation, sleep, meditation, childhood trauma, current relationships, socio-economic stressors, and much more besides, to create the most holistic system in existence.

However, what we are promoting is the idea that anybody, from any school of counselling, could select those aspects that make sense to them, on a personal priority basis; and this book can help them to integrate those self-chosen elements into their own system of talk therapy.  (And it can also be used by self-help enthusiasts to improve their own lives).

This book is proving to be extremely popular with counsellors, psychotherapists and psychologists, on LinkedIn and Facebook.  And it is selling very well.  To get your paperback copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality, below:

Caroline Corkery: “Just bought it; looking forward to getting it”.

~~~

Patricia Gray: “I ordered and received my copy. I anticipate the excitement shared by colleagues”.

~~~

Bobbie Mohler: “I bought this book and (I) am loving it. It’s the goal for my own life and what I want to develop for (my) clients. We were created to live whole lives not compartments. I have seen the difference nutrition makes in my life and in my clients’ lives. Cut out the stuff that isn’t really good that fills grocery shelves. It’s mostly feeding our addictions for bread and sugar designed by genetically engineering grain products to make them cheap to produce, have long shelf lives, and keep humans clawing for more and more”. 

~~~

Nikki Raw BA (Hons) Reg MBACP:  “Have just taken delivery of your book …looking forward to getting into it”. 😊

Get your paperback copy from one of the following Amazon outlets:

In the USA and elsewhere: Amazon.com In the UK and Ireland: Amazon.co.uk In Canada: Amazon.ca  

In Italy: Amazon.it

 

In Germany: Amazon.de In France: Amazon.fr In Spain: Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

This web page contains lots of extracts (including the entire Preface) from our latest book, which is on:

Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching for the Whole Person

Draft-cover-3by Dr Jim Byrne, with Renata Taylor-Byrne :

Counselling psychology and psychotherapy have recently entered a period of accelerated change.

Every system of counselling and psychotherapy needs to be updated in the light of some important discoveries in the sciences which deal with the gut-brain connection; the neuroscience of emotion; nutritional psychiatry; affect regulation theory; and several other significant breakthroughs which have occurred in the past decade; plus new developments in the past twenty years in the role of affect in social cognition.

Those developments have already caused the emergence of lifestyle coaching, health coaching, and a number of other innovations which span the subjects of nutritional therapy, sleep science and physical exercise.

Our new book on Lifestyle Counselling contains much of the information that professionals need to get up to speed with these developments.

To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Jo Ann Burns: “Dr Byrne, I have ordered your book and I look forward to reading it. What you are stating here makes a lot of sense. Jo Ann”.

~~~

Deborah Spratling: “Thanks. (I) Share your views on working with people holistically (in my practice). (I) Bought your book this morning”.

~~~

Dr. Ekta Chauhan: “Hi Dr Jim, Today (I) came across this post (feeling lucky), (I) read the excerpt, (I’m) impressed and (so I) ordered the book. Looking forward to read it… thanks”.

~~~

Vilma Kontou (On LinkedIn): “I love your holistic approach, Dr Jim Byrne. I will definitely order it. Thank you for sharing it with us !”

~~~

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca  

Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es

 Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching

for the Whole Person:

Or how to integrate nutritional insights, physical exercise and sleep coaching into talk therapy

Hello, and welcome to this page of introductory information about our new book (as at 22nd March 2018). This book is now available at the various Amazon outlets listed above.

Extract:

Draft-cover-3In this book, you will find a very clear, brief, easy to read introduction to a novel approach to ‘counselling the whole person’.

This emotive-cognitive approach does not restrict itself to mental processes.  We go beyond what the client is ‘telling themselves’, or ‘signalling themselves’; or what went wrong in their family of origin. Or what is going on in their social environment today.

We also include how well they manage their body-brain-mind in terms of diet, exercise, sleep, and emotional self-management (including self-talk, or inner dialogue).

And we propose that it is better for counsellors and therapists to operate in a primarily right-brain modality, and to use the left-brain, cognitive processes, secondarily.

The most important, and novel, chapters in this book are as follows:

• Chapter 4, which summarizes our research on the impact of diet/nutrition and physical exercise on mental health and emotional wellbeing.

• Chapter 5, which reviews the science of sleep hygiene, plus common sense insights, and presents a range of lifestyle changes to promote healthy sleep, and thus to improve mental and emotional wellbeing.

• Chapter 9, which explains how to incorporate the learning from chapters 4 and 5 into any system of talk therapy or counselling.

There is also a chapter (8) on counselling individuals using our Emotive-Cognitive approach, in which there is a section (8.3(b)) on using the Holistic SOR model to explore many aspects of the lifestyle of the client.

To be more precise: The holistic SOR model states that a client (a person) feels and reacts, at point ‘R’ (Response), to a (negative or positive) stimulus at point ‘S’ (Stimulus), on the basis of the current state of their social-body-mind (or their whole Organism).  Important variables include the following:

• How well rested are they? How high or low is their blood-sugar level (which is related to diet and nutrition)?

• How well connected are they to significant others (which is a measure of social support)?

• How much conflict do they have at home or at work?  What other pressures are bearing down upon them (for examples: from their socio-economic circumstances; physical health; home/ housing; work/ income; security/ insecurity; etc.)

• And how emotionally intelligent are they? (Emotional intelligence is, of course, learned, and can be re-learned!)

Within the Holistic-SOR model (as shown in Figure 8.2 below), in the middle column, what we are aiming to do is to construct a balance sheet (in our heads) of the pressures bearing down on the client (person), and the coping resources that they have for dealing with those pressures.

Feedback from LinkedIn:

Maria Frangia Rayias Ph.D. (On the Psychology Network Group, on LinkedIn): 26th April 2018:  “I integrate a holistic approach into my therapy. I cannot wait until I read this book to help me supplement what I do… Yes I do mean that. For mental and physical health…”

Nerine Strachan (On LinkedIn, on 28th April 2018): “I think good practitioners will always take a holistic approach… after all we are a connected and integrated system not separate parts operating independently. This is part of the trauma informed movement, but yes I agree body and mind need to have a much greater focus in initial training”.

~~~ 

Eleanor Avinor, PhD (On LinkedIn, 4th May 2018): “I am glad that you are including nutrition in your book. It sounds fascinating and I am looking forward to reading it. I am now studying nutritional medicine and am convinced that nutrition has a place in psychotherapy”.

Feedback from LinkedIn, on 30th May 2018:

Greta Aronson: “I’ve been looking for a resource like this for weeks! I’ve been exploring the logistics of pursuing some type of certification or specialization in this area to implement in my work. Any leads or information about any programs, online certification classes, etc?” (Jim’s reply: Yes, I offer a CPD Certificate, here:  https://ecent-institute.org/cpd-cert-in-lifestyle-counselling/).

~~~

In addition, there is Chapter 6, which teaches how to help the client to re-frame any negative experience, using six perspectives, or frames, or lenses. These Six Windows mostly conform to some of the best insights among the philosophical propositions shared by moderate Stoicism and moderate Buddhism. But we discard the harsh and unworkable elements of extreme Stoicism and extreme Buddhism.  This ‘Six Windows’ Model, which was created by Jim Byrne, with a contribution from Renata Taylor-Byrne, is easy to understand and easy to use.

Chapter 7 deals with how to understand and manage human emotions.  This chapter reviews a wide range of perspectives, including: Darwin and the evolutionary psychology perspective; the Buddhist and Stoic views; and many modern perspectives, including: neuroscience; cognitive science; interpersonal neurobiology; attachment theory; and affect regulation theory.  And that chapter includes a good deal of guidance on how to manage anger, anxiety and depression using a multifactorial approach which straddles diet, exercise, sleep, stress management, emotional self-management, mind-management, and so on.

And the book includes a quick review of a whole range of models and tools which we use in Emotive-Cognitive counselling, and which can be incorporated into the practices of integrative and holistic counsellors, psychologists and psycho-therapists.

~~~

Available now: To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Olivia Bolton: “This (book information) is great… I will be ordering a copy of your book in the immediate future!”

~~~

Vanessa McHardy: “Looking forward to reading this have just ordered, it is definitely how I would like to work more, is there any trainings available in the UK?”

~~~

Dee Tozer: “What a brilliant holistic approach – I’ll definitely buy it – Well done Jim Byrne”. 

~~~

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca  

Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

 

~~~

Four samples of Social Media feedback about this book. (More shown further down this page):

Nikki Raw BA (Hons) Reg MBACP (On LinkedIn):  “Have just taken delivery of your book …looking forward to getting into it”. 😊

Margaret Juricek (On LinkedIn):  “I agree with your totally comprehensive approach to counselling”.

Vilma Kontou (On LinkedIn): “I love your holistic approach Dr. Jim Byrne. I will definitely order it. Thank you for sharing it with us !”

Dr Sowmya Suryanarayana (On LinkedIn): “I cannot wait until it arrives Dr Jim Byrne 🙂 Thank you so much for writing it and letting us know of its availability 🙂 :-)”.

Swapna Nadgauda:  I would love to read this as I have read your previous books – very informative to me as a psychologist”. 

~~~

Cover, full, revised 7- Feb 13 2018

Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching

for the Whole Person:

 

Or how to integrate nutritional insights, physical exercise and sleep coaching into talk therapy

By Jim Byrne DCoun FISPC

With Renata Taylor-Byrne BSc (Hons) Psychol

Cover design by Charles Saul

Hebden Bridge: The Institute for E-CENT Publications, in collaboration with the CreateSpace Platform (Amazon)

~~~

About the authors

Lead author: Jim Byrne has a doctoral degree in counselling and a master’s degree in education; plus a diploma in counselling psychology and psychotherapy, and a number of counselling certificates and accreditations.  He has been involved in counselling psychology and psychotherapy (private practice) for almost twenty years; and he’s studied optimum nutrition and balanced exercise approaches to improve his own physical and mental health for decades.  He is the creator of Emotive-Cognitive Embodied Narrative Therapy (E-CENT), which emphasizes the interactionism of body-brain-mind-environment as a whole system, which is what underlies the phenomenon which some see as ‘the life of the individual’, and which he has characterized as the embodied and embedded social-self.  

~~~

Contributing author: Renata Taylor-Byrne did most of the research and writing on the diet, exercise and sleep elements of this work.  She has an honours degree in psychology, plus diplomas in nutrition, stress management, CBT and other systems of coaching and counselling.  She taught health and nutrition courses, as well as counselling, stress management, self-assertion, and other personal development courses, in further education, with adult students, during a thirty-five year teaching career.  As a Lifestyle Coach, she has a very strong interest in the link between diet, exercise, sleep, health, and emotional wellbeing.

~~~

Disclaimer

This book is intended for educational purposes only, and does not claim to be a medical text, nor to promote any medical prescriptions or processes.  We discuss the relationship between physical health and emotional wellbeing, especially in relation to diet, exercise, sleep, nutritional supplements, meditation and relaxation.  While every care is taken in preparing this material, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for any damage or harm caused by any treatment, advice or information contained in this book.  You should consult a qualified health, fitness or nutritional practitioner before undertaking any treatment.

~~~

Let’s take a look at the first of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 1

And here’s the first of the Index pages:

Index, page 1

~~~

Available now: To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

A further five samples of social media feedback:

Teresa Patrício (On LinkedIn):  “It seems very interesting and I will definitely buy it. Thank you!”

Marnie Ellis Fulton (On LinkedIn), 19th April 2018): “I Like this integration of talk therapy, exercise, sleep and nutrition. I utilize this approach in my practice. Look forward to reading this book!”

Michal Baghlani – (the founder of Aware Psychology & Coaching, in Sydney, Australia) – commented upon this book, on LinkedIn, saying she agreed totally with the content of the book.  She then went on to say: “I see much more progress in clients when they address their emotional wellbeing from a holistic perspective.”

Sherri Edelman, PsyD, LPC (On LinkedIn): As a holistic psychotherapist with a doctorate in behavioral medicine/psychology; and past owner of a wellness center opened in 2002 for body/mind health joining both services together with complementary and alternative treatments and services: this (books) is very encouraging!” (5th April 2018).

Sharon Belhamel (On LinkedIn):I’m a holistic therapist myself, combining naturopathy with individual and family counselling. I believe integrative health or holistic health is the wave of the future. Mental health issues should be addressed as part of an overall healthcare plan, not put in a separate silo. Your book looks like an interesting read. Thanks”.

~~~

~~~

And now, here are the full Preface and Prologue (with pages of the Contents and Index interspersed):

Preface

Introducing the contents

In this book, you will find a very clear, brief, easy to read introduction to a novel approach to ‘counselling the whole person’. This emotive-cognitive approach does not restrict itself to mental processes.  We go beyond what the client is ‘telling themselves’, or ‘signalling themselves’; or what went wrong in their family of origin. We also include how well they manage their body-brain-mind in terms of diet, exercise, sleep, and emotional self-management (including self-talk, or inner dialogue). And we propose that it is better for counsellors and therapists to operate in a primarily right-brain modality, and to use the left-brain, cognitive processes, secondarily.

The most important, and novel, chapters in this book are as follows:

Chapter 4, which summarizes our research on the impact of diet/nutrition and physical exercise on mental health and emotional wellbeing.

Chapter 5, which reviews the science of sleep hygiene, plus common sense insights, and presents a range of lifestyle changes to promote healthy sleep, and thus to improve mental and emotional wellbeing.

Chapter 9, which explains how to incorporate the learning from chapters 4 and 5 into any system of talk therapy or counselling.

There is also a chapter (8) on counselling individuals using our Emotive-Cognitive approach, in which there is a section (8.3(b)) on using the Holistic SOR model to explore many aspects of the lifestyle of the client.

To be more precise: The holistic SOR model states that a client (a person) feels and reacts, at point ‘R’ (Response), to a (negative or positive) stimulus at point ‘S’ (Stimulus), on the basis of the current state of their social-body-mind (or their whole Organism).  Important variables include the following:

How well rested are they? How high or low is their blood-sugar level (which is related to diet and nutrition)?

How well connected are they to significant others (which is a measure of social support)?

How much conflict do they have at home or at work?  What other pressures are bearing down upon them (for examples: from their socio-economic circumstances; physical health; home/ housing; work/ income; security/ insecurity; etc.)

And how emotionally intelligent are they? (Emotional intelligence is, of course, learned, and can be re-learned!)

Within the Holistic-SOR model (as shown in Figure 8.2 below), in the middle column, what we are aiming to do is to construct a balance sheet (in our heads) of the pressures bearing down on the client (person), and the coping resources that they have for dealing with those pressures.

In addition, there is Chapter 6, which teaches how to help the client to re-frame any negative experience, using six perspectives, or frames, or lenses. These Six Windows mostly conform to some of the best insights among the philosophical propositions shared by moderate Stoicism and moderate Buddhism. But we discard the harsh and unworkable elements of extreme Stoicism and extreme Buddhism.  This ‘Six Windows’ Model, which was created by Jim Byrne, with a contribution from Renata Taylor-Byrne, is easy to understand and easy to use.

Chapter 7 deals with how to understand and manage human emotions.  This chapter reviews a wide range of perspectives, including: Darwin and the evolutionary psychology perspective; the Buddhist and Stoic views; and many modern perspectives, including: neuroscience; cognitive science; interpersonal neurobiology; attachment theory; and affect regulation theory.  And that chapter includes a good deal of guidance on how to manage anger, anxiety and depression using a multifactorial approach which straddles diet, exercise, sleep, stress management, emotional self-management, mind-management, and so on.

And the book includes a quick review of a whole range of models and tools which we use in Emotive-Cognitive counselling, and which can be incorporated into the practices of integrative and holistic counsellors, psychologists and psycho-therapists.

…Interruption of text for insert…

~~~

More feedback on Lifestyle Counselling book, from LinkedIn (12th April 2018)

Mandi Rowe: (On the Psychology Network, on LinkedIn): “Sounds like a must read for my masters program! Getting it now. Thx!”

Dee Tozer (On LinkedIn): “What a brilliant holistic approach – I’ll definitely buy it – Well done Jim Byrne”. 

Dr. Dan Dalton (On LinkedIn): “How does one purchase a copy of this very interesting book?”

Terence Ramsay (On LinkedIn): “Thank you for sharing (about this book) Dr Jim Byrne – I am an aspiring Clinical Psychologist and will surely find your new book highly insightful into holistic therapy. I am a huge fan of attachment theory also and from reading your profile, find your work to be insightful. I will buy your book. Thanks for sharing”.

Felicia Gail Thrasher “Hi Dr. Byrne I am delighted to see that I am in line with your forward thinking. I teach a substance abuse education class on Wednesday nights where I work and the topic for our discussion for the month of April is Life Skills and how effective they are to the transition the residents are making into their various lifestyles. I am in agreement with you style and plan to incorporate your teachings in our next sessions. Thanks for the share!”

Stephanie Troy, LICSW (On LinkedIn): It is very rare to see people in the mental health field talk about the connection between diet and mood. Despite the research on the gut brain connection, we still predominantly think of disturbance of emotions as related to mental illness. I would love to read your book. I’m in Boston, MA trying to pave the way with combining being a nutrition coach and yoga teacher with being a licensed social worker. Thank you for your share…it’s always nice to know there are like minded folks out there!”

~~~

~~~

And now, here is the second of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 2

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

And here are five more samples of social media feedback:

Johanna Thullbery, LMHC, MA, CGP (On LinkedIn): “As a licensed professional counselor, I have studied and practised an integrative approach for the past 5 years. The research on links between inflammatory processes and brain health may soon reach a critical mass of practitioners. Although some clients seem to need the quick fix of medications to jump-start their behavioral changes, many have improved their mood and anxiety management through lifestyle changes without resorting to pharmacological interventions. I look forward to reading your book to discover new techniques in this exciting field.”

Tori Dabasinskas “Great work Jim! It’s this “lifestyle” theme that we highlight thru our WIT  Professionals benefit (program) that we offer to companies. Your heart, writings and research in your work are so appreciated.”

E Baird (On LinkedIn): Thank you for your brilliant version of therapy.  It has highlighted some realities of the individual situation that, truly, medicine/ psychoactive drugs alone will not address”.

Charles Westheafer (On LinkedIn): “Hi, I’ve been operating from this perspective for a very long time. For a short example, I have criticized CBT for being TOO focused on Left hemisphere thinking for 40 years”.

leanne jackson “Couldn’t agree more…. as a Pharmacist, Clinical Psych and Neuropsychologist, my first line of treatment recommendations are based on lifestyle factors… sleep hygiene, exercise and diet.. Without these, results are poor….and of course, appropriate psychological therapies, depending ….. In most cases, pills aren’t necessary”.

 

~~~

~~~

The origin of this book

Much of the material in this book was originally published in Byrne (2016) – Holistic Counselling in Practice.  However, that book turned out to be too expensive, partly because of its number of pages; but even more because we included a lot of full-colour illustrations. And we put a lot of supportive material in a set of appendices at the back of the book.

Because that book was so over-full, we decided, in 2016, to omit any material on sleep deprivation and its effects upon mental health; apart from some passing references.  However, we now believe that was a mistake, as it seems likely that seriously disturbed individuals may often have to fix their sleep pattern before they can fully concentrate upon making dietary changes or committing to regular physical exercise.

The title of the original work also was a bit opaque.  It did not clearly indicate the treasures contained within its pages, or how useful they could be to counsellors across the whole spectrum of counselling schools.

Because of the problems outlined above, we have now decided to republish some of the original material under a new, more descriptive title, and omitting the material which had been in the appendices, plus most of the illustrations.  We also deleted a chapter (which was number 9) on holistic self-management strategies for self-help enthusiasts.  That material will be incorporated into a subsequent book on how to manage our emotions.

We have now, in this new edition,

– added a brief chapter (5) on fixing sleep hygiene problems,

– plus a briefer summary of our recommendations regarding diet and exercise than was contained in the original edition.

– And we have added a brief chapter on how to integrate lifestyle coaching into any system of talk therapy.

…interruption of text for insert…

And now for the second of the Index pages:

Index, page 2

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

LinkedIn comments on 27th March: On the Psychology Network Group:

Feedback on Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching for the Whole Person:

– “Sounds great indeed….. !” (Dr Rossano Wells).

– “Very good to have published a book of this kind Doctor. Congrats”. (Jean Felix Aimable NTAKIYIMANA, PhD).

– “I’m looking forward to reading it!” (Tamaiiko Singleton).

– “Such a necessary resource! Mazel Tov on elevating the world”. (Shira Goldberg).

– “Congratulations to you”. (Samira Rahmani).

Furthermore, on this group alone238 individuals clicked that the *Liked* this book! (Increased to 299 by 26th April!)

~~~

Goals for this book

Furthermore, we have come to terms with the fact that most readers want a manageable amount of material which does not overload them in terms of the amount or changing and learning and growing involved.  They do not want a comprehensive book, which covers everything about the holistic approach to counselling the whole person, all in one volume.  They want to get that learning in digestible chunks, spread out over time.

Therefore, in this volume, we have tried to emphasize our presentation of the following issues:

(1) How to understand some core ideas about the impact of poor quality sleep, inadequate nutrition and lack of physical exercise upon the body-brain-mind of the counselling client.

(2) How holistic or integrative counsellors can integrate elements of sleep, diet and exercise coaching into their talk therapy about broader emotional problems with life difficulties. And:

(3) How to teach the broader picture of the causes and cures of emotional distress, including reframing strategies.

We hope you enjoy working with the material in this book, whether you are a counsellor/ psychotherapist/ psychologist; a student of those disciplines; or a self-help enthusiast who wants to improve your own body-brain-mind functioning for a better life. And regardless of which school of counselling, or psychotherapy tradition, to which you belong.

Jim Byrne, Doctor of Counselling

Hebden Bridge, 12th March 2018

~~~

…Interruption for insert…

Here is the third of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 3

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Selected comments on LinkedIn on 10th April 2018

Bruce Collins “Of course, we are complex beings… therefore a multifaceted, eclectic approach is always a good idea. Also, I applaud anything that offers an alternative to the notion that a pill is the best option. Although for some it should be remembered, the the hard graft of insight therapy is the answer, and nothing will replace that… as the core approach for such individuals”.

Lorna Lambert (Assoc CIPD) “Delighted to see this approach gaining more prominence amongst our practising communities. (I am) A firm believer in the integrative approach and we must be looking at the whole person inside and out.”

Autumn Hahn “Absolutely agree! I call it “holistic treatment”, but it’s the same principles – we’re all one body with a mind inside, so treat the whole system well”.

Linda Simon “Totally agree with an integrative approach! As long as it is given with a licensed professional as opposed to those who call themselves “life coaches”. As a licensed MFT (Marriage and Family Therapist) for over 30 years, I have used this type of approach along with CBT and have found it to be helpful for many clients. Love to read your book!”

Tina Amaro, MS, LPC “This sounds so much like what I want to do more of in my own work! Thank you for sharing this, loving this too! I wonder if you could call yourself an Holistic Counselor or something similar to identify yourself doing this kind of work? Does that make sense?”

Katherine Compitus “I love this (approach)!”

~~~

Prologue

In these pages you will find a detailed introduction to the theory and practice of one of the most recent, and most comprehensive, forms of holistic counselling and psychotherapy.

This new system (for helping people to optimize their positive experiences of life, and to process their negative experiences), necessarily deals with emotions, thinking, stories and narratives, plus bodily states; and thus is called Emotive-Cognitive Embodied Narrative Therapy (E-CENT).  But we do not wish to proselytize for this system.  We would be happy to have individual counsellors and therapists, from all the schools of counselling and therapy, experimenting with adding some small elements of our innovations into their own, idiosyncratic systems for helping their own clients.

This book has been designed to be helpful for three audiences:

(1) Counsellors, psychotherapists, coaches, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, educators and others;

(2) Students of counselling, psychotherapy, psychology, psychiatry, social work and related disciplines; and:

(3) Self-help and personal development enthusiasts.

The content of this book has been a long time incubating, at the very least since 2001 when I first tried to defend the ABC model of Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) by relating it to the three core components of Freud’s model of the mind (or psyche):

(1) the Id (or It [or baby-at-birth]);

(2) the Ego (or sense of self, or personality); and

(3) the Superego (or ‘internalized other’, including social and moral rules).

The more I tried to defend REBT, the more its core models fell apart in my hands! See Byrne (2017) in the References near the back of this book.

At the same time, I was studying thirteen different systems of counselling and therapy, from Freud and Jung, via Rogers and Perls, and the behaviourists, to the cognitivists and existentialists.

Later, I considered Plato’s model of the mind, alongside the Buddhist and Stoic philosophies of mind.

Into this mix, at some point, Attachment theory arrived, and that helped to make more sense of the emerging model of mind: (Gerhardt, 2010).  Attachment theory, and Object relations theory – (Gomez, 1997) – eventually formed the core of my model of the mother-baby dyad, and the way in which the mind of the baby was born out of the interpenetration (or overlapping interactions) of the physical baby and the cultural mother.

And this gave rise to a greater awareness of the individual counselling client as a ‘social individual’, who is ‘wired up’ (neurologically) by social stories (about social experiences) to be a creature of habit, living out of historic scripts; and viewing the world through non-conscious frames (or lenses) which dictate how things ‘show up’ in their automatic (cumulative-interpretive) apprehension of the external world.

As these developments were reaching fruition, I also discovered the insights of interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB – Siegel, 2015) and Affect Regulation Theory (Hill, 2015).

~~~

…Interruption of text for insertion…

Here is the third of the Index pages:

Index, page 3

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Feedback on the Lifestyle Counselling book, from a member of the Mind-Body Health Group, on LinkedIn, on 17th April 12018:

Bertrand Babinet “Thank you. I could not agree more that to look at the body /mind and spirit as one unit it critical whether your focus is more on the coaching or restoring optimal physical health. It is all one and we should all be trained in understanding the whole rather than trying to break human beings in parts. It would also be good if we started approaching the whole social and physical environment as a whole in the same way”.

~~~

Dr. Ekta Chauhan (On LinkedIn): 12th April: “Hi Dr. Jim, today (I) came across this post (feeling lucky), (I) read the excerpt, (I’m) impressed and (so I) ordered the book. Looking forward to read it… thanks”.

Nyagahima Julian Elizabeth (On LinkedIn): 21st April: “I have always been wary of anti-depressants. My clients who suffered from varying levels of depression were often encouraged to join or participate in sports activities. These activities I encouraged were chosen based on previous and current findings and preferences. With this I witnessed over 80% reported lifestyle improvement and 93% decline of depression symptoms within 2-3 months of introduction of physical exercise!!!”

Lynn Hunt (On LinkedIn), 13th April: “Purchased. Looking forward to reading it”.

~~~

…The Prologue continues…

But even beyond those developments, I also became increasingly aware that, because we are body-minds, our experience of sleep, diet, exercise, alcohol, water consumption, and socio-economic circumstances – (in addition to current and historic relationships) – have as much to do with our emotional disturbances (very often) as do our psychological habits of mind. And, in any event, our psychological habits of mind cannot be totally separated from the states of our body-brain-mind.

And in Chapter 4 below, Renata Taylor-Byrne and I present brief but compelling evidence, from reliable sources, that (1) dietary changes and physical exercise can produce dramatic reductions in levels of anger, anxiety and depression; (2) anti-depressants are not nearly as effective as has been claimed (and that physical exercise alone is as effective at curing depression as are antidepressant drugs); (3) that drug companies hide negative trial results; (4) that the real pills often fail to outperform placebo (sugar) pills; (5) that the real pills are often totally ineffective; (6) that they seem to be addictive, and difficult to get off in some cases; and (7) they have serious side effects (in some cases involving suicidal ideation).

And in addition, we agree with those theorists who have argued that physical exercise is at least as effective as anti-depressants; and also that some forms of dietary change can and do reduce and/or eliminate depression, and also reduce anxiety and anger. (See Chapter 4, below).

Counselling and therapy systems have normally ignored the convincing evidence that exercise and diet can change our emotional states.  For example, in Woolfe, Dryden and Strawbridge’s (2003) book on counselling psychology, there are no references in the index to diet or physical exercise[i].  As in the case of McLeod (2003)[ii], there is a ‘virtual postscript’ (in Chapter 29 [of 32] of Woolfe, Dryden and Strawbridge) on counselling psychology and the body – which is essentially about using bodily experience in counselling and therapy – as in breath work, and body awareness – though the chapter author (Bill Wahl) also includes a consideration of body-work as such.  However, in our emotive-cognitive (E-CENT) counselling approach, we consider that direct physical touch is too problematical (ethically) to include in our system of counselling.  What we do include, because it is now clearly an essential ingredient of the health and well-being of the whole-client (body-brain-mind), is awareness of the role of diet and exercise and sleep patterns in determining or influencing the level of emotional disturbance of the client; and an awareness of the need to teach the client that their diet, sleep and exercise practices have a significant impact upon their emotional and behavioural performances in the world.  (See Chapter 4).

~~~

LinkedIn engagements:

I posted the following statement on LinkedIn, on or about 26th April, in connection with letting people know about Lifestyle Counselling and Coaching for the Whole Person:

“(Headline): Time to rethink the body-brain-mind of the counselling client… (Opening question): Is it perhaps time to rethink the curricula for counsellor and psychotherapist training programs?”

When I checked on 30th April, I’d got lots of *Likes* (72), and twelve positive comments. (There were also two people who objected to my line of reasoning, mostly from the point of view of defending Freudianism). So I will now present the twelve supporting comments, in three blocks of four below, under the title of ‘Supportive comments on LinkedIn, on 30th April’:

Supportive comments on LinkedIn on 30th April: Part 1

Maria Frangia Rayias Ph.D.:  “I Agee with you absolutely. We need to upgrade what we do to incorporate the healing of the entire person. We are trying to heal people with outdated means, although talk therapy has its place. … Talk therapy is not enough to help people heal emotionally and prevent physical illness. We exist as mind, body and spirit living in environments that need to support our wellbeing. Negative energy around us and stress hurts us. … We live in our bodies and mindfully we can give our bodies what they need to heal”.

~~~

Stephen Milburn: “Very insightful and I’ve often checked with new and existing clients about the importance of making lifestyle changes. Thanks for the interesting insight”.

~~~

Margaret Juricek: “I agree with all. It’s been my experience there are so many aspects of how our brain works, we’re just scratching the surface of knowledge”.

~~~

Johanne Oakley: “Thank you Dr Byrne! I recommend psychotherapy as one part of moving forward – I walk with clients who need to move, talking therapy is one part of healing – it’s not either/or; it is (rather) and…and…and …., Thank you for your work”.

~~~

…Text interrupted…

…Here’s the fourth of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 4

~~~

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~~~

This then is a story of counselling and therapy revolution: the radical reformulation of most of our major theories of therapy; and their integration into a completely new view of the social individual as a body-brain-mind-environment whole.

Talk therapy has a lot to offer the social individual, but talk therapy alone cannot cure most of the ills of the modern world, many of which are related to the lifestyle of the client. (Interestingly, lifestyle coaching and lifestyle medicine are beginning to emerge in various quarters, including among some psychiatrists, [who are experimenting with diet – ‘Holistic psychiatry’]; some neurologists [‘Holistic neurology’]; and some medical doctors [‘Integrative medicine’, and ‘Nutritional therapy’]. But none of these approaches is nearly as complete or holistic as E-CENT theory and practice).

The world of counselling and therapy is being transformed (once again!).  And in this book, in Chapter 3, we have summarized the core insights arising out of those various revolutions which have already occurred, which have relevance for counselling today.  We have also explored the very latest thinking about how to understand and manage human emotions – especially anger, anxiety and depression, in Chapter 7.

Chapter 4 presents an overview of our research on diet and exercise, and how those two lifestyle factors impact on mental health and emotional wellbeing.

Chapter 5 is a brief review of the impact of sleep on mental health.

Chapter 6 deals with our approach to helping clients to reframe their unavoidable problems – using our Six Windows Model – which draws on the insights of moderate Buddhism and moderate Stoicism.

Chapter 8 explores some of the most important and helpful models we use in E-CENT, to guide our counselling sessions, and to help the client to perfink (perceive, feel and think) more self-supportingly.

The core beliefs of Emotive-Cognitive Embodied Narrative Therapy (E-CENT) are summarized in twenty principles, in Chapter 3.

Counselling and therapy have been in a constant state of evolution and revolution since the creation of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud, in the late nineteenth century. This book represents one of the most recent, and most comprehensive, reformulations; influenced as it is by attachment theory, affect regulation theory, personality adaptation theory, and interpersonal neurobiology.

I hope you enjoy this volume, and that you find some useful theories, techniques, tools and models within: for use in your own way, in your own life, and/or with the people you aim to help.

Dr Jim Byrne

Doctor of Counselling, Hebden Bridge – 12th March 2018

~~~

[i] Woolfe, R., Dryden, W., and Strawbridge, S. (eds) (2003) Handbook of Counselling Psychology. Second Edition. London: Sage Publications.

[ii] McLeod, J. (2003) An Introduction to Counselling. Third Edition.  Buckingham: Open University Press.  Chapter 21 of 21; section 6 of 9 within that final chapter! No references to diet.  This is the totality of his commentary on physical exercise: “The therapeutic value of physical exercise is well established.  But, for the most part, counselling remains centred on talking rather than doing”. (Page 523 of 527!)

~~~

Supportive comments on LinkedIn on 30th April: Part 2

Stephanie Troy, LICSW: “I am a nutrition coach, yoga teacher and social worker. I practice integratively and see no difference between physical health and mental health. It is beyond time for curriculum to be addressed in programs to incorporate the gut-brain research; but that would also require a huge overhaul of how we do treatment. Given the illness model being tied to Big Pharma and insurance it would mean a gigantic shift”.

“I often write about this research and an integrative perspective and post in this group. Thank you for posting as well;-)”

~~~

Lourdes Villena Amoloria: “(I) Totally agree (with) the integration of psycho social, physiologic (and) behavioral barriers to be identified and addressed, if we aim for long term and effective transformation to take place. Thank you for posting”.

~~~

Ken Roberson: “Academia is late to the party. Some of us have been rejecting theories for years in favour of what applies here and now. For many of us it’s not unusual to see academia show up late and detached”.

~~~

Frank Flack: “Yes…” (Referring back to the opening statement, “Is it perhaps time…?”  And Frank answers ‘Yes’, it is time to change the curricula).

~~~

…end of text…

…Here’s the fourth of the Index pages:

Index, page 4

~~~

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~~~

…Chapter 1 begins like this:

Chapter 1: Introduction

1.1 Counsellors and their clients

Good counsellors and psychotherapists devote their lives to caring for the minds of their clients – the lives of their clients. They wrestle with difficult situations, challenging goals, and with dysregulated emotions (like grief and loss; anger and panic; relationship conflict, and mental confusion).

Innovative counsellors are constantly looking for new ways to help their clients.  They mostly begin their careers with a single model of counselling, and many of them add in techniques and models and ideas from any source that seems likely to help their client.  (There are of course a few ‘purists’ who will not deviate from their original training). However, after a few years of practice, in most cases, counsellors end up practicing a hybrid of many different approaches.  Although they normally begin with a very simple model of counselling, and the nature of the counselling client, those perceptions change and evolves over the years.

For example: almost twenty years ago, I would sit in my consulting room, waiting for a counselling client.  I had little to think about, because I already knew what their problem would be – the client’s ‘irrational beliefs’ – and my only challenge would be how to get the client to change to more ‘rational’ beliefs.

Today, more than nineteen years later, when I sit in my counselling room waiting for a new client, I sometimes run through a checklist in my head.  It goes something like this:

  1. I do not know who this client will turn out to be; or how complex their case might be; or how I should begin to think about them. I have to wipe my mind as clear as possible of preconceptions, which, of course, is an impossibility for a human being. (Our preconceptions reside at the non-conscious level, and we most often do not know what they are! And without our preconceptions we would be gaga! We would literally not know what anything was).
  2. This client will be a body-brain-mind, linked to a familial social environment (in the past) and a set of relationships (in the present).

3. They will be subject to a range of stressors in their daily life, and those stressors will be managed by…

…End of extract…

Supportive comments on LinkedIn on 30th April: Part 3

Maya Polywjanyj: “Yes, lifestyle considerations are a must, especially in today’s climate of high stress, eating on the run, little sleep and constant distractions”.

~~~

Nicola Trenorden: “Indeed! Dr John Arden’s work encompasses this understanding with presenting clients. One of his books I would recommend is REWIRE YOUR BRAIN – a synthesis of psychology, mindfulness, nutritional neuroscience, social intelligence and facts about the brain’s capacity for neuroplasticity and neurogenesis”.

~~~

Maria Giuliana, MA, LMHC: “I absolutely agree. As a Counselor Ed and Supervision Doc candidate I hope to make some impact on this shift in thinking to the future of counseling”.

~~~

Terri Cassick: “I would have to agree (with the opening statement about the need for curriculum change) considering I’m studying for my clinical exam. Many techniques from the past appear to be irrelevant for today’s society”.

~~~

…And now for page 5 of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 5

~~~

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~~~

…Chapter 2 begins like this:

Chapter 2: Key elements of the emotive-cognitive counselling approach

2.1: Overview

Chapter 1 set the scene for this brief chapter, which begins with a summation of a few key features of the Emotive-Cognitive Embodied Narrative Therapy (E-CENT) approach.

This is then followed by:

(1) A basic description of E-CENT counselling and its origins;

(2) The importance of emotions;

(3) E-CENT models of the social individual; and his/her emergence from the interactions of a physical baby and a cultural mother; plus:

(4) Typical client problems and counselling tasks.

E-CENT theory sees humans as essentially physical-emotional story tellers – to ourselves and others – and storytellers who live in a concrete world of narratives and scripts; which include reasonable and unreasonable elements; logical and illogical elements; and defensible and indefensible elements.

These stories are not primarily made up by us, individual humans, though we do embellish them, and produce our own variants of them.  But, in essence, these are social stories – stories from our parents, our families, our school and our communities and nations (e.g. via mass media channels).

These are the stories that constitute our social identity, and locate us in a historical web of relationships linked to the past. And these are the stories we inevitably use to interpret our actual, social experiences of our very real lives in the present moment!

One of the basic functions of the central nervous system and perceptual apparatus of a human being (or any mammal) is to help us to classify and evaluate our environmental stimuli (or experiences) into those that we experience as ‘good’ (pleasurable) and those we experience as ‘bad’ (or un-pleasurable).

Humans most often tend to push away (or repress out of conscious awareness) their unpleasant experiences; to refuse or fail to process them; and to then become the (non-conscious) victims of those repressed, denied and undigested experiences.  We do this – ‘pushing away’ (or rejecting), and repressing (out of conscious awareness) of our unpleasant experiences – because we are wired up by nature to seek pleasure and to avoid pain (or un-pleasure.)  But the solution to most of our problems, paradoxically, resides in our courageous willingness to face the pain of unpleasant experiences (which we cannot avoid); to reframe them; to feel them; and to fully digest them.  Only then can they disappear.  You cannot, as Albert Ellis foolishly believed, “forget the god-awful past”.  You cannot forget it because it is hardwired into your neurology, and your physiology/ musculature. And it manifests in your daily habits today. To get rid of it, you have to digest it; complete it, and then file it away.

And there are no therapists who can “extract” your pain!  And no medications that can permanently dissolve your pain (as opposed to hiding it for a while!) Unavoidable Pain has to be faced and processed.  Those individuals who attempt to run away from unavoidable pain by taking recreational or prescription drugs, alcohol, painkillers, etc., end up having to face the same old pain when their escapist strategies eventually prove to be not just useless, but self-harming!

And you have to face your unavoidable pain with a moderate degree of Stoic endurance (or willingness to suffer the unavoidable pain of life); a sensible degree of scientific enquiry into the possibility of changing things instead of endlessly enduring them; and acceptance of the need to digest whatever cannot be eliminated by controlling yourself or your environment.

Our emotive-cognitive (E-CENT) theory also sees adult relationships as being…

…end of extract…

~~~

Feedback from LinkedIn Groups: 30th April 2018

E. Anna Goodwin: “Great article. I guess I was lucky. I had a particular advantage that many counsellors and psychologists don’t have. My 4 year degree was in nursing and then later my MS was in psychology. It helped me always to keep in mind how important it was to integrate body, mind, and emotions throughout my many years in private practice”.

~~~

Peter A Manzo LICSW,CEAP,SAP,ACT: “SPOT ON !!” (Peter was agreeing with my comments, which include these: “Talk therapy alone cannot fix problems of sleep deprivation, dietary indiscretions, lack of physical exercise, the existence of environmental stressors, and so on. Yet those lifestyle factors account for a considerable part of human emotional functioning in general…”

~~~

Sheryl Knopf: “Hi, I agree that we have not been taught to look at the whole person. The mind, body and spirit connection is the whole person. I have been learning and using an integrated approach the past several years called Natural Processing. This integrates EMDR, Somatic therapy and mindfulness all in one. It’s based on integrating the sympathetic nervous system (the gut and polyvagal system) and the brain. If interested, I highly recommend checking it out at Craig Penner’s https://naturalprocessing.org/ 
Thanks for your input Jim”.

~~~

Jeffrey Rose EdS,MFT(Ret AF): “Any Counsellor that does not treat the ‘Whole’ person, body, mind and spirit should not be in practice. Thank you for the post”.

~~~

…And now for the fifth of the Index pages:

Index, page 5

~~~

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~~~

…Chapter 3 begins like this:

Chapter 3: Core beliefs of the emotive-cognitive philosophy of counselling

In a broader sense than that outlined above, E-CENT counselling theory was developed by this author over twenty years of study and application, in private practice, with more than 1,000 clients.  It was also developed through many conversations with Renata Taylor-Byrne about stress, meditation, relaxation, positive mental attitude, diet and nutrition, and various systems of physical exercise.  In recent years, I set out to boil my learning down into a limited list of key principles.  What I came up with was a list of twenty core principles of E-CENT theory, as follows:

The 20 core principles of human development

Firstly, I do not make the mistake of extrapolating from adult functioning in order to understand the psychology of human nature.  Instead, I begin with the baby in the mother’s womb (where the mother may be more or less stressed, and more or less well nourished, depending upon the actual circumstances of her life).  I then move on to the baby post-birth, which is colonized by a carer (normally mother) who may be more or less sensitive to the baby’s signals of comfort and discomfort; more or less responsive to the baby’s needs; and more or less caring.  And I also take account of how stressed the mother was, by her life circumstances, even before the baby was conceived.  These are the foundations of human emotional and general psychological functioning.

~~~

Secondly, I accept the Attachment theory proposition, that the baby is born with an innate attachment drive, which causes it (after period of about twenty to twenty-four weeks of development) to seek to attach itself to a main carer.  The attachment bond that is formed becomes either secure or insecure, depending upon whether the mother (or main carer) is “good enough” – meaning sensitive, responsive, and caring enough to soothe the affective states[i] of the baby.  Later father and siblings become important attachment figures for the baby. And the baby forms a set of internal working models of relationship based upon those earliest relationships.

~~~

Third, the first five or six years of life are taken to be the prime determinants of…

…End of extract…

[i] An ‘affective state’ is a state of the body-brain-mind of an individual, in which there is physiological arousal and a felt sense of emotional attraction (‘positive affect’) or aversion (‘negative affect’).  For most practical purposes, among counsellors, the word affect may be used interchangeably with ‘feelings’ and ‘emotions’.

~~~

Feedback from LinkedIn Groups: 1st May 2018

Robert M Ross You raise many good points here. I certainly agree that we need to look at ourselves and others as an overall system. Nutrition, exercise, medical conditions, as well as our development all contribute to mental health.

~~~

Sharron Grainger It’s really important that therapists take a psychophysiological view of their clients when designing treatment plans. We are not just a head… what happens in our brain/ mind has an impact on our body and vice versa.

~~~

Courtenay Young At risk of receiving some negative feedback, there are three or four main considerations for 21st century counsellors and psychotherapists: [1] We have to integrate our clinical work with what is coming out from research and neuroscience. Very few of us trained in research analysis, and yet counselling and psychotherapy are not sciences – essentially they are craft-type skills, so we need to be informed by science and probably to inform science – as to what really works;

Courtenay Young Continuation: [4] Counselling and psychotherapy need to distance themselves from the whole healthcare, medical paradigm. Most emotional distress does NOT relate to internal pathologies, but to disturbances in the world around us (exogenous, rather than endogenous). We need to find ways to fix what causes people stress and distress, rather than making it out to be something that is wrong with them; [5] Feelings are different from thoughts. Too much emphasis has been put on the Cartesian (mind/body split) ‘thinking’, rather than exploring the intricacies of multi-layered ‘feelings’, often somatically-based, peptide-transmitted, with micro-movement forms of non-verbal communication.

~~~

Kim Nagle, CH,CI Thank you (Jim) for your insight and sharing your ideas!

~~~

Charles Westheafer I find this discussion both very interesting and disturbing, I have been ‘pushing’ most of what you are saying for 40 years. Just do a search on Google for my name, you will discover many of my publications. Australian has been very reticent to even explore my ideas, they ONLY use Narrative and CBT therapies – [nothing else exists]. I have been trying to integrate behavioural therapies, systemic therapies, Freudian and meditation as a therapy, I am being a bit simplistic but I hope it makes some sense.

~~~

…And now for the sixth of the Contents pages:

Contents, page 6

~~~

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~~~

This is how Chapter 4 begins:

Chapter 4: Overview of diet and exercise impacts upon mental health

By Renata Taylor-Byrne and Jim Byrne

4.1: Introduction

The core of this chapter was originally published as Part 5: Summing Up – of our book on diet and exercise – (Taylor-Byrne and Byrne, 2017) – and was written by Renata Taylor-Byrne.  This current version of this chapter has been updated and revised and expanded with the co-authorship of Dr Jim Byrne.

Part 1 of that earlier book (Taylor-Byrne and Byrne, 2017) looked at a number of questions about the ways in which nutrition affects our body-brain-mind and emotions.

One point that we did not cover is this: How do the effects of diet and exercise fit into a psychological model – or psychobiological model – of the human body-brain-mind of the counselling client?  So let us explore that question here and now.

4.2: The psycho-biological model of E-CENT and the impact of diet and exercise

Briefly, the system works like this: Firstly, Figure 4.1 represents a person (B1-3 + Y) subjected to an environmental stressor (A1) who is showing signs of anger (for example) as their outputted emotional Consequence (C2). Y represents the body, and B the brain-mind; and also note the overlap, which stores lived experiences, as little y’s.

The ABYyyyC model

Figure 4.1: The A>B1-3>Y>yyy>C Model of body-brain-mind

A1 is the external stimulus (or what happened) and C2 is the outputted angry response.

Secondly, the elements of causation of the emotional Consequence (C2) amount to at least six, or eight, in our view (depending on how you count the B’s)!  (See Chapter 7 of Byrne, 2017).

By contrast with our view, Albert Ellis (1962) asserted that there was only one cause of any emotional response, and that was the B (or Belief) of the client about some noxious stimulus or stressor (at point A – which is also called the ‘Activating Event’).  However, by contrast with Ellis, and very much in support of our perspective, Aristotle considered that every event had several causative factors involved, which he listed as: (1) The material cause; (2) the efficient cause; (3) the formal cause; and (4) the final cause.  We do not follow Aristotle into using this four-part system of causation, but instead, consider the elements which arise out of our consideration of the client as a whole, complex, open system: or body-brain-mind-environment complexity.  For example, the ‘environment’ aspect includes lots of stress and strain: like time pressure; noise; interpersonal stressors (like conflict, or loneliness, or isolation, or overcrowding); financial stressors (related to debts, job security or insecurity); performance demands; and so on.  And the body-brain is supported or undermined, in handling those stressors, by the quality and quantity of the foods the person eats; what they drink; how much sleep they get, and the quality of that sleep; how much they exercise; the quality of their social connections and social supports; and so on.

As shown in Figure 4.1 above, the factors which cause the C2 (or outputted emotional response) include the following:

The A1 (external Activating Event): The physical or immediate cause.  Something happens which is picked up by the senses of the counselling client.

The A2 (internal Activating Event): The evaluative cause: The client automatically ‘evaluates’ (habitually, non-consciously, and non-linguistically) the significance of this A1 (stimulus).  (This could be seen as the habit-based cause).

The B1-2-3 (Biological emotive-cognitive processing): This is the socially shaped cause.  The innate emotions of the client – managed from the limbic system – have been shaped, socially, by mother, father, teachers and others (in the past, including childhood), which has resulted in a particular kind of ‘affect (or emotion) regulation compromise’ (Hill, 2015), stored in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) of the client’s brain.  Therefore, the B1-2-3 is a habit-based, automatic, socially shaped, evaluation of the stimulus at A1.

The Little yyyyy’s: The historical body-state cause. These are stored states of the body, (stored in the body-brain-mind) in response to similar A1’s in the past, which caused particular kinds of responses in the guts, heart, lungs, facial muscles, and major muscles (like legs and arms) of the client.  These are linked to a particular kind of stimulus, and are ‘matched’ – or ‘pattern matched’ – and ready to be triggered whenever that A1 (or something very similar) is experienced in the future.

The Big Y: This is a representation of the body of the client. It’s capacity to cope with the A1 (or external or physical or initiating cause) is affected by many factors, including the quality and quantity of recent sleep; the level of blood glucose in the body-brain, delivered by particular kinds of foods; the level of cell hydration, delivered by regular supplies of (good or bad) water sources (filtered; from the tap; or from a [plastic or glass] bottle). And also by the state of the gut bacteria of the client.  Some bacteria promote healthy functioning of the body-brain-mind; and some promote unhealthy functioning of the body-brain-mind. (See Enders, 2015; Kaplan and Rucklidge, et al, 2015).

The C1: This can be thought of as those aspects of emotive-cognitive processing that integrate the signals coming from the B1-2-3 (OFC), the little yyyyy’s (body memories), and the Big Y (general health-state of the body, including effects of diet and exercise, sleep, etc.), and this C1 processing (rapidly) selects an appropriate (or apparently appropriate) output (without too much time-wasting ‘cogitation’).

The C2: This is the outputted emotional and behavioural response to the A1 – (which was dictated by the C1 summation of the earlier processing).

It is obvious from this model (and the research quoted in this book) that a well exercised body will handle greater stress (from the A1) than a body that has not been exercised.  (Blumenthal, et al., 2012; Ratey and Hagerman, 2009; Taylor-Byrne and Byrne, 2017; and Sapolsky, 2010).

A client who sleeps at least eight hours each night will handle greater stress from the A1 than a person whose sleep pattern is broken, or is too short, or is in some other way inadequate.  (Walker, 2017; and Van der Helm and Walker, 2009).

And, the quality of the food that the client consumes will either support or undermine their capacity to withstand stressors at A1. (Korn, 2016; Perlmutter, 2015; Greger, 2016).

~~~

In the main body of this chapter, we now want to turn our attention to some of the key points that emerged from our consideration of the impact of (historical and current) diet and exercise practices upon the body-brain-mind of the counselling client).

4.3: The importance of food for the body-brain-mind

Firstly, we can’t function properly without food, because food provides the energy for physical and mental activity, and the material to rebuild our cells. Inadequate nutrition impacts…

…End of extract…

Feedback from LinkedIn: 2nd May 2018

Bruce Collins: “No one therapeutic approach helps all. But that said; a broad, multifaceted, mind/ body approach… has the potential to help many! I look forward to reading this work”.

~~~

PS: 3rd May:

Carmen Robinson: (On LinkedIn): “I believe mind and body are linked – absolutely. Physiology has a massive impact”.

~~~

Namrta Mohan: (On LinkedIn): “This (book, on Lifestyle Counselling) is absolutely wonderful! :-)”

~~~

….And now for the sixth of the Index pages:

Index, page 6

~~~

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~~~

Feedback on 3rd May:

Elyce M. Benham, M.S.: (On LinkedIn): “Even as a teen, I couldn’t understand Drs, Therapists, etc., not taking everything into consideration when trying to work/help/heal their clients/patients, etc. It was like needing glasses, but not wearing any & needing an entire team of professionals to acquire & analyze information, but only work with unsubstantiated self-reports from the patient/client. It just seemed totally inadequate! 😳”

~~~

Dr Patrick G Gwyer CSci: (On LinkedIn): “A really interesting point Dr Jim Byrne. Having worked in a range of settings (crisis, assertive outreach, intensive care and acute psychiatric units) with a range of complex problems and trauma, before any “therapeutic” work begins we always make sure the solid back four is in place (diet, sleep, routine, exercise) we also look at social factors such as relationships, housing, education / employment and that emotional regulation skills are in place. …”

And the reason for all this background work (according to Dr Patrick G Gwyer) is this: “If you open a can of worms, people need to be able to tolerate holding the worms without fear”. 

~~~

And now for an extract from Chapter 5:

Chapter 5: The impact of sleep on mental health and emotional wellbeing

By Renata Taylor-Byrne and Jim Byrne

~~~

5.1 Introduction

If you want to be able to stay in control of your anger, anxiety and depressive tendencies, under pressure, then you have to give a high priority to your sleep patterns, on a nightly basis.

What do the experts say about the impact of sleep disturbance, sleep loss, deprivation, or sleep insufficiency?

Firstly, according to Dr James Maas (1998), an early expert on sleep science, if you are getting less than eight hours of sleep each night, including at weekends, then you are one of the millions of chronically sleep-deprived individuals, who normally are unaware of how sleepy and ineffective they are, or how much more effective they could be, including emotionally, if they got enough sleep.

Later, Shawn Stevenson (2016) argued that every aspect of your mental, emotional and physical performance is affected by the quality of your sleep.

And just last year, Matthew Walker (2017) wrote that if you sleep less than six or seven hours a night as a regular habit-pattern, then this will destroy your immune system and double the likelihood of you developing cancer.  It would make you more susceptible to the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and if you had just one week of such reduced sleep, it would destabilise your blood sugar level to the extent that you could be diagnosed as pre-diabetic.

And of course, most sleep science commentators refer to the negative impact of sleep insufficiency on mood and emotions, including depression, anxiety and anger causation.

Indeed, Walker (2017) considers that sleep is the foundation upon which diet and exercise need to stand, if the whole system is to work well.

If you have an inadequate sleep pattern, this cannot be compensated for by good dietary and exercise practices!

~~~

In this chapter, we will look at the following subjects:

  • Common sense ideas about sleep;
  • Distractions from sleep;
  • Problems caused by sleep insufficiency;
  • The benefits of sleep; and:

Insomnia and sleep insufficiency; as well as science-based, researched remedies for sleep problems.

5.2: The primary importance of sleep

In our earlier book on diet and exercise – Taylor-Byrne and Byrne (2017) – we presented a range of studies which show that human emotional disturbances are caused, or affected, for better or worse, by what we eat, and fail to eat; how we exercise, or fail to exercise; and we also referred in passing to sleep as another major factor in determining our mental health and emotional well-being.

This range of three major sources of good or poor mental health, and high or low levels of emotional well-being, are well documented in the scientific literature. (Lopresti, 2013).

And many theorists would say that sleep is the most important of these; followed by diet; and then exercise.

For example, as Walker (2017) points out, although it’s not good for us to go without food and/or liquid for one day…

…End of chapter extract..

~~~

Feedback from LinkedIn, on 5th May 2018:

Sivie Suckerman, LMHC: Responding to my (Jim’s) point about the need to change the curricula for training counsellors:

“We know SO much more about the nervous system and neuroscience (now) that I hope finds its way into academic settings when (individuals are) learning to be a therapist. My training in grad school doesn’t touch the info I have now and it’s shaping of how I treat (my clients). Thanks for bringing this up!”

~~~

After I (Jim) thanked Marion Driver M.Ed on LinkedIn for some feedback on the Lifestyle Counselling book, she responded:

“A pleasure, Dr Byrne … Thank you, for sharing such valuable information. :-)”.

~~~

PS: on 7th May

Graham Hart: “(I) Like this thinking; thank you Dr Byrne”.

~~~

…And now for the seventh and final Contents page:

Contents, page 7

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Ilze Alberts: “It’s so refreshing to read about your holistic approach. Tackling challenges with an integrative body-mind approach is my core belief and approach in assisting my clients”.

~~~

CARLES VENTURA FARRE: “We are waiting for a Spanish translation.”

~~~

Judith Martin: “I agree totally (with your holistic approach)! My wonderful daughter in law has had many issues with ADD, vision, and fatigue also mental confusion, it have been going on for about 12 years off and on. No doctor or therapist once thought about Lyme disease and no doctor in Texas thought of testing for it!! Someone did and that was the cause of everything. We must be more open to looking at the whole person when they come to us for help. We are not MD’s; however we should be able to recognize diet, sleep, and lack of good self-care and make referrals”.

~~~

And now for an extract from Chapter 6:

Chapter 6: Re-framing experiences with the Six Windows Model

6.1: Introduction

We begin from the position that our counselling clients are largely feeling beings; and indeed, habit-based feeling beings; who mainly operate from the emotional, non-conscious right side of their brain.  We therefore set out to provide a warm, accepting relationship for our clients, in which we help them to regulate their feelings and moods, by a mixture of emotive and cognitive strategies.

In this chapter, I want to present one of the main cognitive strategies that we use to help clients to rethink their problems in a way which will empower them.

We emotive-cognitive (E-CENT) counsellors normally utilize a range of models to conceptualize and manage various stages in the counselling process.  (See Chapter 8 below).

For example, the simplest model is the EFR model, which looks like this:

E = Event = What happened (or what happens)?

F = Framing = The client has a non-conscious, habitual way of ‘framing’ that Event, so that it shows up in some predictable form: (good or bad; manageable or overwhelming; etc.)

R = Response = The client feels and acts upon a characteristic emotional response to the framed-event (which could be with anger, fear, sadness, depression, etc.)

(A frame may be thought of as being like a tinted lens, which tints whatever is perceived through it.  A frame is a predisposing way of seeing things).

The EFR model differs from the ABC model of rational and cognitive therapy (REBT/CBT) in that the F (or framing) is always non-conscious, spontaneous, habit-based, and emotional.  The client is not assumed to ‘chose’ the frame they use; nor are they blamed (implicitly or explicitly) for being wired up (currently) with their particular range of frames.  Those frames which colour their perceptions:

(1) are products of their socialization;

(2) can be changed, with effort, over time;

(3) but cannot be other than they are right now!

The EFR model is normally used in conjunction with the Holistic-SOR model which is shown in Figure 6.1(a) on the next page.  This Holistic-SOR model is used to teach the client that everything that affects them as an organism (O) – like sleep, diet, exercise, stress and strain – also affects their emotional and behaviour responses (R) to noxious stimuli (S – or negative experiences).

However, in this chapter I mainly want to introduce the Six Windows Model.  This is our most original model, though it is not as central as the Holistic-SOR model.  Although it is not as central as the Holistic-SOR model, the Six Windows model requires more space and time to explain and illustrate the six key perspectives involved. Hence the need for its own chapter.

Feedback from LinkedIn: 8th May 2018:

Mark Reddy: “Well done Jim, brilliant on all counts”.

~~~

DR Estelle Fuss: (Responding to my point about the simplistic nature of Carl Rogers’ and others’ theories of counselling, she writes: “I vaguely recall Carl Rogers; guess his teaching was OK but not inspiring (at least not for me). Alfred Adler (among others) became my ‘steady’ … I trained at the Adler Institute and was supervised by his children, Dr Alexandra (daughter) and (son) Dr Philip …. I enjoy Hercules Poirot detective stories, especially since we both are from Belgium, speaking French as well…” (This last point refers to the detailed Lifestyle counselling approach to detecting the precise element of body-brain-mind-environment complexity which is causing emotional distress for any particular client).

~~~

6.1(a) Context:

The Six Windows Model is applied in the context of having assessed the client’s overall state of body-mind, (using the Holistic-SOR checklist, in Column 2 below). It is only used when it has been decided that it would be most helpful to focus upon re-thinking, or re-framing, at this time (as opposed to diet, sleep, exercise, etc., which would be dealt with later, or which have already been dealt with). The concept of ‘re-framing’ is defined as meaning ‘changing the lens through which the client views the problem’. And this can often (though not always, or easily) help the client to reduce the intensity of their felt emotional response to a noxious stimulus.

Holistic SOR model

Figure 6.1(a): The E-CENT holistic SOR model

However, for us, there is a tension here between two processes, …

…End of extract…

…And now for the seventh of the Index pages:

Index, page 7

~~~

To get your paperback copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Feedback from LinkedIn, on the Lifestyle Counselling book, on 8th-9th May:

Mary Fernandez: “This (Lifestyle counselling approach) totally makes sense to me. I want more information on this. Do you have any books, trainings or workshops on the topic? Thank you so much for your very insightful post”.

~~~

Diane Akkad: “(Thank you) Very much! Great information (about lifestyle counselling)”.

~~~

And now for an extract from Chapter 7:

Chapter 7: Understanding and managing human emotions – including the integration of talk therapy and dietary and exercise guidelines

7.1: Introduction

Because counsellors and psychotherapists deal with their clients’ emotions – (as well as their behaviours, goals, relationships; plus their environmental stressors, and so on) – every system of counselling and therapy has to have a theory of emotion.  This, however, is a significant problem, for three reasons:

1. Firstly: Human emotionis hugely complex. For example, Stephen Pinker, in his book on how the mind works, draws attention to a quotation from G.K. Chesterton about the unutterable complexity of human emotional tones and moods and shades, which begins like this:

“Man knows that there are in the soul tints more bewildering, more numberless, and more nameless than the colours of an autumn forest”. (Page 367)[i].

Therefore, at the very least, we should show some humility in developing our systemic models of such complexity.

2. Secondly: As one psychotherapist has pointed out:

“The terms ‘feeling’ and ‘emotion’, and ‘affect’ are used in many different senses in psychology.  A review of more than twenty theories of emotion reveals a plethora of widely diverging technical definitions.  These vary with the technique of investig-ation, the general theoretical framework, and the value-judgements of the psychologist.  Often, they are so diverse as to defy comparison let alone synthesis”.[ii]

So we are not going to arrive at a universal definition of emotion in this book; though we have to come to some working hypotheses, in the form of practical conclusions, which allow us to understand and help our clients.

3. Third: There is a good deal of confusion regarding whether emotions are innate, or socially imposed; and whether they exist ‘inside the client’ or ‘outside’ in social relationships.

With regard to point 3, which is the most fundamental question we face, we should resolve that issue up front:

In E-CENT counselling, we use the insight from Dylan Evans’ (2003) book on emotion, about ‘degrees of innateness or learned emotions’. This means that we accept the conclusion that some basic emotional wiring is innate, at birth.  However, those basic emotions (or feelings, or affects) are inevitably shaped by the culture of the mother (and father [normally]) into acceptable and unacceptable expressions of affect – or observable manifestations of feelings – over time. The main concepts we use are:

(1) Innate emotional wiring (Panksepp 1998) like, anger, fear, disgust, sadness, etc.; which are also seen as basic emotions[iii] – (Siegel, 2015);

(2) Higher cognitive emotions (like pride, confidence, guilt and shame, jealous, trust and so on – (as in Panksepp and Biven, 2012); and:

(3) Culturally specific emotions: (For example: the ways in which various universal emotions are manifested differently in different cultures; e.g. the more restrained Japanese versus the more expressive Americans – (Evans, 2003).

Somewhere between the universal, higher cognitive emotions and the culturally specific emotions, I would place the “family variations” in the range and mode of expression of the basic emotions and higher cognitive emotions.

Feedback on the Lifestyle Counselling book: From LinkedIn, 9th – 10th May 2018:

Shanna Nasche: “I … agree with your written summary about the positive effects of exercise, sleep, (and) eating on mood. I would add mindfulness and social support as 2 more. I am not a fan of taking medication; however, I believe it has a place, depending on the depth of the mood problem….”

~~~

Jessica Rosander MS, QMHP-T: “Looking forward to reading this (Lifestyle Counselling book)!”

~~~

So, individuals have some of the ‘universal shape’ implied by Plato, Freud, Albert Ellis, Eric Berne, etc.; but also quite a lot of ‘family shaping’ which is idiosyncratic and unique. Plus national (and class) variations in how those emotions are expressed.

In evolving our theory of emotion, we went back as far as it is possible to go in developing knowledge of our ancestors, and what we inherited from them.  For example, we have been influenced by the perspective of Jonathan Turner (2000)[iv], which can be summarized like this: “…our ability to use a wide array of emotions evolved long before spoken language and, in fact, constituted a preadaptation for the speech and culture that developed among later hominids.  Long before humans could speak with words, they communicated through body language their emotional dispositions; and it is the neurological wiring of the brain for these emotional languages that represented the key evolutionary breakthrough for our species”.

And according to Panksepp (1998), those emotional systems are located in…

…End of extract…

~~~

[i] Pinker, S. (2015) How the Mind Works.  London: Penguin Random House.

[ii] Hobson, R.F. (1985) Forms of Feeling: The heart of psychotherapy. London: Routledge. Page 88.

[iii] Paul Ekman (1993) identified the most universal, basic emotions – from a detailed international study – as: anger, fear, disgust, sadness, and enjoyment. See: Ekman, P. (1993) Facial expression and emotion. American Psychologist 48 (4): Pages 384-392.

[iv] Turner, J.H. (2000) On the Origins of Human Emotions. A sociological inquiry into the evolution of human affect.  Stanford University Press.  See the book outline at this website: http://www.sup.org/ books/title/?id=436

~~~

Available now : To get your copy, please click the Amazon link which serves your geographical locality:

Amazon.com Amazon.co.uk Amazon.ca Amazon.it

 

Amazon.de Amazon.fr Amazon.es  Anywhere worldwide

Or Amazon India

~~~

Feedback on the Lifestyle Counselling book, from LinkedIn, on 10th – 11th May 2018

Dr. Rodolfo Valentino: “Dear Colleagues, I do not want to destroy the idyll, but when I look around my friends and colleagues, who all work in psychiatric, psychological, medical, life style and coaching areas, I sometimes wonder who really needs help: the clients or my colleagues. (The disturbing things I see include) Lack of sleep due to overtime, insomnia due to night shift, poor lifestyle and poor diet due to family disruption, irregular daily routine, socially accepted and latent drug use, unsafe employment contracts and resulting life crises, planning uncertainty for the future, etc. And that, just to name a few aspects. :-0”

~~~

…Extract from Chapter 8: Please go to the continuation page, here: https://abc-counselling.org/lifestyle-counselling-book-continued/

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